Tag Archives: learning

I want it to be as a quail.

Lee_Broom

 

As an art dealer I am often asked for my expertise in determining the value of a work of art or antique passed on to them by Aunt Minnie or Grandpa Frank; the interrogator of the moment appears to hope that by meeting me that they have stumbled into their own Road Show host who is about to make them rich for a month or two.

Of course a competent appraiser is competent not because of on-the-spot knowledge but by competency as a researcher. To carry that much stuff around in ones’s head, even as a specialist in one small area would drive most people mad. Add to that the fact that such knowledge is amended every second of every hour and we have light-years of information to edit.

And that’s how it is with life in general for all of us. In our professional lives we learn how to research and maybe we pick up a few tidbits of stable factoids which help to enhance our aura of concern in our supposed area of expertise. And in our personal lives we solve the most difficult research problems by adopting the views of whatever groups seem to influence us the most.

And on it goes.

If I return for another crack at life I want it to be as a quail.

No particular reason; I just like and respect quails.

012

There’s a quail in this picture somewhere.

 

Advertisements

I want it to be as a quail.

Lee_Broom

As an art dealer I am often asked for my expertise in determining the value of a work of art or antique passed on to them by Aunt Minnie or Grandpa Frank; the interrogator of the moment appears to hope that by meeting me that they have stumbled into their own Road Show host who is about to make them rich for a month or two.

Of course a competent appraiser is competent not because of on-the-spot knowledge but by competency as a researcher. To carry that much stuff around in ones’s head, even as a specialist in one small area would drive most people mad. Add to that the fact that such knowledge is amended every second of every hour and we have light-years of information to edit.

And that’s how it is with life in general for all of us. In our professional lives we learn how to research and maybe we pick up a few tidbits of stable factoids which help to enhance our aura of concern in our supposed area of expertise. And in our personal lives we solve the most difficult research problems by adopting the views of whatever groups which seem to influence us the most.

And on it goes.

If I return for another crack at life I want it to be as a quail.

No particular reason.

I like and respect quails.

That’s all.

 

I HEARD ABOUT THAT

Lee_Broom

Overheard on the bus .

“Yeah, I heard about that already”;

“Sure, I know about that”.

“Oh yeah, everybody knows about that already.”

“According to a double-blind study…..”

 

What is more important to you when gathering information? Being among the first to know? Accuracy? Popularity?

When you seek information on Google, Yahoo or Bing do you check for accuracy? Do you first scan the document for signs of propaganda? Can you explain in twenty-five words or less the difference between Truth and Proof?

Do you understand the goals of scientific inquiry or why the goal of proving anything destroys any possibility of discovering truth?

Didn’t you know…..?’

“Oh sure, I know about that”.

“you can bet that everybody knows about that already.”

 

THE REST OF YOU

IMG_0001

Untie the knot and soften your glare

What you think is there is knot.

What you thought was writ as laissez faire

Was read but green with rot.

 

Untie the knot and soften your glare

Laugh and

Giggle and coo.

What you thought you heard was never said

What you failed to hear was You.

 

Untie the knot and soften your glare.

Empty you mind

(Its rude to stare)

Allow the moment to be

And dare

To Listen

To The Rest Of You.


Listen

To The Rest

Of You.

Posted April 1, 2013 by Lee Broom in Choices, Love

Tagged with 

SOLUTIONS

 

Lee Broom

To the best of my knowledge, about 8% of the 100,000 LinkedIn viewers who have attempted to solve the following problem this week, have done so.

11×11=4

22×22= 8

33×33= ???

Those who were successful understood that this was not a math problem. When viewed as simply a problem of logic one needs only to completely understand the basic premise of the first syllogism, test it against the syllogism of groups of twos until the match becomes apparent and then replicate their success with the groups of threes.

With most problems in our daily lives for which solutions are not apparent, many of us tend to seek others for solutions. Among those seeking such help there will be some whose personal integrity will compel them to seek only the path rather than the destiny.

And among those who believed they had solved the problem unaided, all by themselves will be those who will guard their secret, perhaps because the exclusivity of belonging to a distinctively small group of scholars who realize that the importance of such a membership will be diluted by revealing their secret. Not that any of that is important.

I don’t know what group I belong to. I just know that my life which was once guided by logic still is.

OH YES, ABOUT THAT “not a math problem” PROBLEM…

 

I want it to be as a quail.

Lee_Broom

As an art dealer I am often asked for my expertise in determining the value of a work of art or antique passed on to them by Aunt Minnie or Grandpa Frank; the interrogator of the moment appears to hope that by meeting me that they have stumbled into their own Road Show host who is about to make them rich for a month or two.

Of course a competent appraiser is competent not because of on-the-spot knowledge but by competency as a researcher. To carry that much stuff around in ones’s head, even as a specialist in one small area would drive most people mad. Add to that the fact that such knowledge is amended every second of every hour and we have light-years of information to edit.

And that’s how it is with life in general for all of us. In our professional lives we learn how to research and maybe we pick up a few tidbits of stable factoids which help to enhance our aura of concern in our supposed area of expertise. And in our personal lives we solve the most difficult research problems by adopting the views of whatever groups which seem to influence us the most.

And on it goes.

If I return for another crack at life I want it to be as a quail.

No particular reason.

I like and respect quails.

That’s all.

 

LEADERSHIP; Lets Get ‘er Done.

Lee_Broom

We who call ourselves Leaders, Teachers and Sales Professionals are self-assured. We understand that Teachers can’t teach, that Sales Pros can’t sell. We understand that the pupil and the prospect are responible for their own decisions. Those of us who apply for and obtain a Leadership position are suddenly faced with the problem of how to persuade our newly acquired team to think as a team, our prospects to buy and our pupils to learn.

Every teacher faces this same problem at least twice a year. Their success begins with the first roll call. By the last name checked off the roster the observant Teaching Pro has identified leaders, rebels and scholars and will seek their assistance before the bell rings.

Sales professionals whose closes are frequent are closing with the first handshake and building referrals with the second.

So much for the pep talk. Let’s get ‘er done.

By Lee Broom
From Leadership: A Love Story.