Tag Archives: buyer resistance

Until one understands…

Lee_Broom

Until one understands Love, one’s only protective device is Fear.

Until one  understands Fear, one’s only protective device is Love.

During gestation one’s primary protective device is Love.

With birth the new life is introduced to Fear.

 

When serving customers or when wanting to offer your company’s product for sale are you operating from a base of Love or of Fear?

How do you feel about your answer to this question?

When you are introduced to a new product or a new idea are you cautious or are you curious?

How do you feel about your answer to this question?

Enjoy your weekend.

 

 

 

 

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Until one understands…

Lee_Broom

Until one understands Love, one’s only protective device is Fear.

Until one  understands Fear, one’s only protective device is Love.

During gestation one’s primary protective device is Love.

With birth the new life is introduced to Fear.

 

When serving customers or when wanting to offer your company’s product for sale are you operating from a base of Love or of Fear?

How do you feel about your answer to this question?

When you are introduced to a new product or a new idea are you cautious or are you curious?

How do you feel about your answer to this question?

Enjoy your weekend.

 

 

 

 

FISHBAIT

 Lee_Broom

“Oliver was a thinker. He was a man of few biases, He was seldom tempted to prove anything to himself or others; his tool for learning was the tool of discovery. And, if he heard or read or even thought something that did not logically conclude from preceding statements his brain would stop dead in its tracks.

‘What?’ he’d say to himself, ‘that can’t be right’ and without even having to test the idea his brain would present an instant YouTube of information whizzing before his inner vision on mega-fast-forward and satisfied, he’d then move on to the next thing, unless of course his discovery was important enough to stop for a moment and commit to the three by five Wexford memo pad in his shirt pocket.  

Oliver’s thinking skills appeared almost immediately. he spoke before he walked. began his career in sales and customer service in the seventies and was a very fast learner. Today his listening and reasoning skills serve him well in his work; Oliver is a very successful Customer Service Representative. His careful attention to listening well and for asking the right discovery questions has provided him with a great income and an excellent reputation among his peers. But one day he was surprised with something for which he had no answer. He had listened carefully. He found an opening and asked a few YES questions and then made a suggestion to the client whose spontaneous reply  was ‘Why?’.

Oliver squirmed and fidgeted, he hemmed and he hawed and as he struggled for to regain control of his faculties he discovered that he was talking to himself.”

From Leadership: A Love Story. By Lee Broom.

 

Talking to ourselves can sometimes be an impediment to success; it can also be an excellent tool for success. But never should it be a part of our conversation with a prospect. And never, ever will a successful CSR ask a prospect or a client “Why” about anything.

The same heed must be taken when the person on the other end of the line asks “Why”. Oliver, realized later than he could have easily segued into responses explaining “How”, “What”, even “Who”, “Where” or “When”.

We like to think that today we are more sophisticated than the Olivers of decades past with our iPads and smart phones but the real tools are the ones we carry between our ears. We may have a slightly larger vocabulary to accommodate our electronic toys but the way we talk with others and the respect that is necessary for our daily transactions is as old as language itself.

Unless you’re going fishing and really do need a can of worms, Listen, Investigate and Learn.

THE IMPORTANCE OF LISTENING

When someone we love (or not) is speaking, are we listening?

Do we we half-listen, tuned partially to the recognition of possible keywords while formulating our own.

It’s important.

If a sales person had this very bad habit, that person would soon be out of work.

I have a   client who has been doing this for years.

She told me she knows she does it but never while “doing” it.

She is upset with her habit and wants to stop.

Her husband sounded furious; He insisted he wanted her to stop this “infuriating, absurd habit”.

When they came to me for help I suggested a change, not for the wife but for the husband. At my request he agreed to stop talking so much and to occasionally insert one word confirmations of the last word of the last sentence that left his lover’s lips.

That was months ago.

They came to visit recently and told me their life together was once again quite “friendly”. And “Surprise, surprise”, the husband who earns his living selling real estate, is reporting a surge of new sales.

And they say they love each other.

That’s what they say.

Curiosity

lee_broom
I get a lot of questions from readers about photography. Today it was about using titles to sell images. We know a lot about selling but not everything. We start with what we know and then seek answers for what we don’t. We experiment. We learn. We apply what we learn.
When conducting an experiment one must focus on the process rather than the result. Experimenting is about forgetting the obvious and seeking the unknown.
Discovering a good title has to do with guarding against  telling  the viewer the results  and encouraging them to make some discoveries on their own?
If instead of telling a story with a picture, I did that by writing a book, would I  tell the reader the ending or would I tease her and coax her to take part in The Process.
When you read a whodunnit, don’t you try to at least guess at what’s coming up in the next paragraph and after a few correct guesses don’t you guess at whether the killer was the butler or the victim’s childhood sweetheart?

A title that is a perfect fit will soon be forgotten. Subtlety inspires curiosity. Curiosity produces ideas.

Ideas produce sales.

GOODS AND SERVICES

Lee_Broom

GOODS AND SERVICES

We shop for Goods.

We compare one with another.

We read the literature.

We listen to the pitch.

We compare benefits.

We prioritize.

We experiment.

And if we buy, we “buy” THE SERVICE.

We shop for Goods; we “buy” THE SERVICE

Even if only for beauty…

Even if only for fame…

We buy the SERVICE.

Or we DO NOT

Yesterday you were the prospect.

Today you are the CSR, the TSR, the Clerk, the Account Manager.

Present the SERVICE.

This is what we BUY.

image001
Lee Broom

Apes Parrots Lemmings and Marketing


Ilustrations from Wikipedia

There is a learning principle that appears to hold for all creatures. It seems to be nearly as true for humans as it is for apes, parrots and lemmings. This most popular method for learning is the practice of mimicking others of our ilk. When reading of Michelangelo or Edison or Picasso we like to compliment ourselves for being related to such creative history makers and yes, we all have a story describing a moment in our personal histories demonstrating our own particular genius for solving problems and contributing to the overall good of us all.

But we still prefer to make our choices by acknowledging and repeating the claimed successes of friends, family and perhaps the promise of a degree of fame.

As marketers, it is left to us to overcome buyer’s resistance to new products; we do this by using the information gathered by the social scientists among us and adjust our market plans accordingly. We then must overcome unforeseen problems as soon as possible after the product reaches a predetermined saturation point.

Shortly after WW II, the electric blanket was introduced. Instantly popular, the product was an immediate success. However, when an unseasonably cold winter set in, complaints started coming back that these electric blankets were not providing enough warmth. Millions of dollars and trillions of words pursued a re-education program of how to properly use the electric blanket.

Heat rises and therefore maximum comfort would not be achieved if snuggling beneath the blanket; it must go under the bottom sheet. The habit of blanket-use acquired over centuries, resisted all attempts to refine the images supported by words and concepts like “snuggle” and “comfy”. Going to bed was for most Americans a ritual with strong expectations of release from a day of struggle and stress.

Eventually, it occurred to someone to give the electric blanket a new name. Soon it was being marketed as a mattress pad. That was nearly two decades ago. Googling nomenclature for both products quickly reveals that there are to this very day, five times as many listings for the tag “electric blanket” as for “electric mattress pad”.